Rab and His Friends by John Brown


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Title: Rab and His Friends

Author: John Brown, M. D.

Release Date: April, 2004 [EBook #5420]
[Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule]
[This file was first posted on July 14, 2002]
[Date last updated: August 16, 2005]

Edition: 10

Language: English

Character set encoding: ASCII

*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK RAB AND HIS FRIENDS ***




Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Charles Franks
and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team





RAB AND HIS FRIENDS

BY JOHN BROWN, M.D.

WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY HERMANN SIMON AND
EDMUND H. GARRETT.

PHILADELPHIA:
1890.




PREFACE.

Four years ago, my uncle, the Rev. Dr. Smith of Biggar, asked me to give
a lecture in my native village, the shrewd little capital of the Upper
Ward. I never lectured before; I have no turn for it; but Avunculus was
urgent, and I had an odd sort of desire to say something to these
strong-brained, primitive people of my youth, who were boys and girls
when I left them. I could think of nothing to give them. At last I said
to myself, "I'll tell them Ailie's story." I had often told it to
myself; indeed, it came on me at intervals almost painfully, as if
demanding to be told, as if I heard Rab whining at the door to get in or
out,--

"Whispering how meek and gentle he could be,"--

or as if James was entreating me on his death-bed to tell all the world
what his Ailie was. But it was easier said than done. I tried it over
and over, in vain. At last, after a happy dinner at Hanley--why are the
dinners always happy at Hanley?--and a drive home alone through

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