Patty's Butterfly Days by Carolyn Wells


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Page 1

VI AUNT ADELAIDE

VII A GARDEN PARTY

VIII THE HOUSE PARTY ARRIVES

IX BIG BILL FARNSWORTH

X JUST A SHORT SPIN

XI THE WORST STORM EVER!

XII A WELCOME SHELTER

XIII AT DAISY'S DICTATION

XIV PAGEANT PLANS

XV IN THE ARBOUR

XVI THE SPIRIT OF THE SEA

XVII THE APPLE BLOSSOM DANCE

XVIII A COQUETTISH COOK

XIX A FORCED MARCH

XX GOOD-BYE FOR NOW




CHAPTER I

DIFFERENT OPINIONS


"Different men are of different opinions; some like apples, some
like inions," sang Patty, as she swayed herself idly back and
forth in the veranda swing; "but, truly-ooly, Nan," she went on,
"I don't care a snipjack. I'm quite ready and willing to go to the
White Mountains,--or the Blue or Pink or even Lavender Mountains,
if you like."

"You're willing, Patty, only because you're so good-natured and
unselfish; but, really, you don't want to go one bit."

"Now, Nan, I'm no poor, pale martyr, with a halo roundy-bout me
noble brow. When we came down here to Spring Beach, it was
understood that we were to stay here part of the summer, and then
go to the mountains. And now it's the first of August and I've had
my innings, so it's only fair you should have your outing."

Though Patty's air was gay and careless, and Patty's tones were
sincere, she was in reality making an heroic self-sacrifice, and
Nan knew it. Patty loved the seashore; she had been there three
months, and loved it better every day.

But Nan cared more for the mountains, and longed to get away from
the sunny glare of the sea, and enjoy the shaded walks and drives
of higher altitudes. However, these two were of unselfish nature,
and each wanted to please the other. But as Patty had had her wish
for three months, it was certainly fair that Nan should be
humoured for the rest of the summer.

The season had done wonders for Patty, physically. Because of her
outdoor life, she had grown plumper and browner, her muscles had
strengthened, and her rosy cheeks betokened a perfect state of
health. She was still slender, and her willowy figure had gained
soft curves without losing its dainty gracefulness.

And Patty was still enthusiastically devoted to her motor-car.
Indeed, it was the realisation that she must leave that behind
that made her so opposed to a trip to the mountains.

Mr. Fairfield and Nan had both dilated on the charms and beauties
of mountain scenery, on the joys and delights of the gay mountain
hotels, but though Patty listened amiably, she failed to look upon
the matter as they did. At first, she had declared her
unwillingness to go, and had tried to devise a way by which she
might remain at Spring Beach, while her parents went to the
mountains. But no plan of chaperons or visiting relatives seemed
to satisfy Mr. Fairfield of its availability.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Sun 22nd Sep 2019, 17:02