The Girl Scout Pioneers; or Winning the First B. C. by Lilian C. McNamara Garis


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Page 1

V. A FRIENDLY ENEMY

VI. A NOVEL JAIL

VII. TENDERFOOT ADVENTURES

VIII. CLUE TO THE MISSING

IX. TRIBUTE OF ROSES

X. TELLING SECRETS

XI. THE TANGLED WEB

XII. TESSIE

XIII. BROKEN FAITH

XIV. WOODLAND MAGIC

XV. VENTURE TROOP

XVI. MORE MYSTERIES

XVII. JACQUELINE

XVIII. DAISIES AND DANGERS

XIX. THE FLYING SQUADRON

XX. CLEO'S EXPERIMENT

XXI. FORGING AHEAD

XXII. THE WHIRLING MAY-POLE

XXIII. RAINBOW'S END




CHAPTER I

GIRLS AND GIRLS


It was much like a scene in a movie play. The shabby dark room
lighted by a single oil lamp if any light could make its way
through the badly smoked glass that served as a chimney, the
broken chair, and the table piled high with what appeared to be
rags, but which might have been intended for wearing apparel, the
torn window curtain hanging so disconsolately from the broken cord
it had one time proudly swung from, and the indescribable bed!

Like some sentinel watching the calamitous surroundings, a girl
stood in the midst of this squalor, her bright golden hair and her
pretty fair face, with its azure blue eyes, marking a pathetic
contrast to all the sordid, dark detail of the ill-kept room. She
took from the side pocket of her plaid skirt a bit of crumpled
paper, and placing it directly under the lamp, followed its
written lines. Having finished the reading, she carefully folded
the worn slip again, and returned it to her pocket. Then she threw
back her pretty head, and any frequenter of the screen world would
have known instantly that the girl had decided--and further, that
her decision required courage, and perhaps defiance.

With determination marking every move, she crossed to the tumbled
bed, and stooping, dragged from beneath it a bag, the sort called
"telescope," and used rarely now, even by the traveling salesman,
who at one time found the sliding trunk so useful. It would
"telescope," and being thus adjustable, lent its proportions to
any sized burden imposed upon it. Into this the girl tossed a few
articles selected from the rummage on the table, a pair of shoes
gathered from more debris in a corner, and on top a sweater and
skirt, taken from a peg on the door. All together this composed
rather a pretentious assortment for the telescope.

But the girl did not jam down the cover in that "movie" way common
to runaways, rather she paused, glanced furtively about the gloomy
place, and finally taking a candle from a very high shelf, lighted
the taper, evidently for some delicate task in the way of
gathering up her very personal belongings.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Tue 15th Oct 2019, 9:23