Spadacrene Anglica by Edmund Deane


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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Spadacrene Anglica, by Edmund Deane

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: Spadacrene Anglica
The English Spa Fountain

Author: Edmund Deane

Commentator: James Rutherford and Alex. Butler

Release Date: August 2, 2005 [EBook #16417]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SPADACRENE ANGLICA ***




Produced by Malcolm Farmer, Stephanie Maschek and the
Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net






Transcriber's Note: A carat is used in some instances to indicate
superscript. If part is in brackets, then only those letters in
brackets are superscripted and the rest of the word is the normal size.




SPADACRENE ANGLICA. OR, _The English Spa Fountain._


BY EDMUND DEANE, M.D. OXON.


The First Work on the Waters of Harrogate.


_REPRINTED WITH INTRODUCTION_ BY JAMES RUTHERFORD, L.R.C.P. ED.


_AND BIOGRAPHICAL NOTES_ BY ALEX. BUTLER, M.B.


BRISTOL: JOHN WRIGHT & SONS LTD. LONDON: SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON,
KENT & CO. LTD. 1922




INTRODUCTION.


If the Author of "Spadacrene Anglica" could see our modern Harrogate,
for whose existence he is to no small extent responsible, he would be
justly entitled to consider his labours as well spent, however surprised
he might be at the change that had taken place in the village as he knew
it in the year 1626. For so was Harrogate in those years, a small
scattered hamlet, part of that great Royal Forest of Knaresborough,
extending westward from the town of Knaresborough for about 20 miles
towards Bolton Abbey, with an average depth of about 8 miles from North
to South, a Royal Forest, as Grainge in his History thereof premises,
from the year 1130 until 1775. Not only the change in the physical
aspect of Harrogate would have been noted by our author. Since his days,
within a radius of a few miles, have been found over 80 mineral springs,
whereby Harrogate is distinguished from all other European health
resorts. Not that the curative powers of these waters were altogether
unknown before Edmund Deane extolled the merits of the Tuewhit Well in
"Spadacrene Anglica." Indeed, he would be a bold man who would
dogmatically lay down at what period the powers of these waters were

Robert's were accredited with miraculous powers. The Tuewhit Well itself
derives its name, according to some authorities, from its association in
pre-Roman times with the pagan God Teut.

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