Ellen Walton by Alvin Addison


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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Ellen Walton, by Alvin Addison

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: Ellen Walton
The Villain and His Victims

Author: Alvin Addison

Release Date: July 22, 2005 [EBook #16345]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ASCII

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ELLEN WALTON ***




Produced by The Online Distributed Proofreading Team at
http://www.pgdp.net










ELLEN WALTON;

OR, THE VILLAIN AND HIS VICTIMS.


BY ALVIN ADDISON,

AUTHOR OF THE RIVAL HUNTERS, ETC.

CINCINNATI:
H.M. RULISON, QUEEN CITY PUBLISHING HOUSE, 115-1/2 MAIN STREET.
PHILADELPHIA:
QUAKER CITY PUBLISHING HOUSE, 32 SOUTH THIRD STREET.
1855.

Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1855, by

H.M. RULISON,

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court, for the Southern District of
Ohio.




THE VILLAIN AND HIS VICTIMS.




CHAPTER I.

FLEMING'S HOTEL.


In the year 1785, as, also, prior and subsequent to that time, there was a
hotel situated in one of the less frequented streets of Pittsburg, then the
largest town west of the mountains, and kept by one Fleming, whence it
derived the name of "Fleming's Hotel." This house, a small one, and
indifferently furnished, was a favorite resort of the Indians who visited
the town on trading expeditions. Fleming had two daughters, who possessed
considerable personal attractions, and that pride of a vain
woman--_beauty_. History does not, to the best of our knowledge, give us
the first names of the two girls; and we will distinguish them as Eliza and
Sarah. Unfortunately for these young females, they had ever been surrounded
by unfavorable circumstances, and exposed to the vices of bad associations;
and that nice discrimination between propriety and politeness, which is a
natural characteristic of the modest woman, had become somewhat
obliterated, and the hold which virtue ever has by nature in the heart of
the gentler sex, had been somewhat loosened. In short, the young Misses
Fleming failed at all times to observe that degree of propriety which
should ever characterize the pure in heart, and were, by many, accused of
immorality. How far this accusation was true, we shall not attempt to say,
but, doubtless, there were not wanting many tongues to spread slanderous
reports.

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