A Treatise on Simple Counterpoint in Forty Lessons by Friedrich J. Lehmann


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The Project Gutenberg EBook of A Treatise on Simple Counterpoint in Forty
Lessons, by Friedrich J. Lehmann

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: A Treatise on Simple Counterpoint in Forty Lessons

Author: Friedrich J. Lehmann

Release Date: July 21, 2005 [EBook #16342]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A TREATISE ON SIMPLE ***




Produced by David Newman, Dainis Millers and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net






_SEVENTH EDITION_




A Treatise on
Simple Counterpoint
in
Forty Lessons

By

Friedrich J. Lehmann

_Instructor of Theory in the Oberlin Conservatory of Music Author of
"Lessons in Harmony"_

G. SCHIRMER, INC.

NEW YORK




PREFACE


The purpose of this work is to supply the need in the Oberlin Conservatory
of Music of a text-book on Simple Counterpoint containing a definite
assignment of lessons, and affording more practice than usual in combining
species.

It is a treatise on strict counterpoint, but strict in a limited sense
only. In two-part counterpoint with other than the first species in both
parts, dissonances are permitted under certain conditions, and in three-
and four-part writing the unprepared seventh and ninth, and the six-four
chord, are allowed in certain ways.

While the illustrations have been written in close score, it is
nevertheless urged that all exercises be written out in open score, as the
movement of the different parts is thus more clearly seen.

The use of the C-clefs is left optional with the teacher.

A knowledge of harmony is presupposed, hence nothing is said pertaining to
it.

The author wishes to express his indebtedness to Professor A.E. Heacox for
his help and advice.

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