The Mansion of Mystery by Chester K. Steele


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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Mansion of Mystery, by Chester K. Steele


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: The Mansion of Mystery
Being a Certain Case of Importance, Taken from the Note-book of Adam Adams, Investigator and Detective


Author: Chester K. Steele



Release Date: July 4, 2005 [eBook #16204]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE MANSION OF MYSTERY***


E-text prepared by Al Haines



THE MANSION OF MYSTERY

Being a Certain Case of Importance, Taken
from the Note-book of Adam Adams,
Investigator and Detective

by

CHESTER K. STEELE

Author of "The Disappearance of John Darr"

International Fiction Library
Cleveland New York
Press of the Commercial Bookbinding Co., Cleveland

1911







CHAPTER I

THE STORY OF A DOUBLE TRAGEDY

The young man was evidently in a tremendous hurry, and as soon as the
ferryboat bumped into the slip he was at the gate and was the first one
ashore. He beckoned to one of the alert taxicabmen, and without
waiting to have the vehicle brought to him, ran to it and leaped inside.

"Do you know where the Vanderslip Building is?" he questioned abruptly.

"Yes, sir."

"Then take me there with all possible speed."

"Yes, sir."

The door slammed, the taxi driver mounted to his seat, and off the taxi
started at the best rate of speed the driver could attain. The young
man sank down among the cushions and buried his chin in his hands.

His face, normally a handsome one, was now wrinkled with care, his hair
was disheveled, and he looked as if he had lost much sleep. At times
his mouth twitched nervously and he clenched his fists in a passion
which availed him nothing.

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