The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 281, November 3, 1827


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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and
Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 281, November 3, 1827, by Various


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 281, November 3, 1827


Author: Various



Release Date: June 21, 2005 [eBook #16098]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE MIRROR OF LITERATURE,
AMUSEMENT, AND INSTRUCTION, VOL. 10, ISSUE 281, NOVEMBER 3, 1827***


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THE MIRROR OF LITERATURE, AMUSEMENT, AND INSTRUCTION.

VOL. X. No. 281.] SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1827. [PRICE 2d.



* * * * *




MANNERS AND CUSTOMS OF ALL NATIONS.

* * * * *

NO. XIV.

* * * * *

[Illustration]


The first of the above engravings represents one of the _Body Guards
of the Sheikh of Bornou_, copied from an engraving after a sketch
made by Major Denham, in his recent "Travels in Africa." These negroes,
as they are called, meaning the black chiefs and favourites, all raised
to that rank by Some deed of bravery, are habited in coats of mail,
composed of iron chain, which cover them from the throat to the knees,
dividing behind, and coming on each side of the horse; some of them wear
helmets or skull-caps of the same metal, with chin-pieces, all
sufficiently strong to ward off the shock of a spear. Their horses'
heads are also defended by plates of iron, brass, and silver, just
leaving room for the eyes of the animal; and not unfrequently they are
hung over with charms, enclosed in little red leather parcels, strung
together, round the neck, in front of the head, and about the saddle.

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