A Man's Woman by Frank Norris


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The Project Gutenberg eBook, A Man's Woman, by Frank Norris


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
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Title: A Man's Woman


Author: Frank Norris



Release Date: June 20, 2005 [eBook #16096]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A MAN'S WOMAN***


E-text prepared by Suzanne Shell, Mary Meehan, Project Gutenberg Beginners
Projects, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team
(http://www.pgdp.net)



A MAN'S WOMAN

by

FRANK NORRIS

1904







The following novel was completed March 22, 1899, and sent to the
printer in October of the same year. After the plates had been made
notice was received that a play called "A Man's Woman" had been written
by Anne Crawford Flexner, and that this title had been copyrighted.

As it was impossible to change the name of the novel at the time this
notice was received, it has been published under its original title.

F.N.

New York.




A MAN'S WOMAN




I.


At four o'clock in the morning everybody in the tent was still asleep,
exhausted by the terrible march of the previous day. The hummocky ice
and pressure-ridges that Bennett had foreseen had at last been met with,
and, though camp had been broken at six o'clock and though men and dogs
had hauled and tugged and wrestled with the heavy sledges until five
o'clock in the afternoon, only a mile and a half had been covered. But
though the progress was slow, it was yet progress. It was not the
harrowing, heart-breaking immobility of those long months aboard the
Freja. Every yard to the southward, though won at the expense of a
battle with the ice, brought them nearer to Wrangel Island and ultimate
safety.

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