The Wharf by the Docks by Florence Warden


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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Wharf by the Docks, by Florence Warden


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: The Wharf by the Docks
A Novel


Author: Florence Warden



Release Date: June 19, 2005 [eBook #16092]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE WHARF BY THE DOCKS***


E-text prepared by Marilynda Fraser-Cunliffe, Mary Meehan, and the Project
Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net)



THE WHARF BY THE DOCKS

A Novel

by

FLORENCE WARDEN

Author of "The Mystery of the Inn by the Shore," etc.

1896







CHAPTER I.

SOMETHING AMISS.


Everybody knows Canterbury, with its Old-World charms and its
ostentatious air of being content to be rather behind the times, of
looking down upon the hurrying Americans who dash through its cathedral
and take snap-shots at its slums, and at all those busy moderns who
cannot afford to take life at its own jog-trot pace.

But everybody does not know the charming old halls and comfortable,
old-fashioned mansions which are dotted about the neighboring country,
either nestling in secluded nooks of the Kentish valleys or holding a
stately stand on the wooded hills.

Of this latter category was The Beeches, a pretty house of warm, red
brick, with a dignified Jacobean front, which stood upon the highest
ground of a prettily wooded park, and commanded one of those soft,
undulating, sleepy landscapes which are so characteristically English,
and of which grazing sheep and ruminating cows form so important a
feature. A little tame, perhaps, but very pleasant, very homely, very
sweet to look upon by the tired eyes that have seen enough of the
active, bustling world.

Mr. George Wedmore, of the firm of Wedmore, Parkinson and Bishop,
merchants of the city of London, had bought back the place, which had
formerly belonged to his family, from the Jews into whose hands it had
fallen, and had settled there to spend in retirement the latter end of
his life, surrounded by a family who were not too well pleased to
exchange busy Bayswater for what they were flippant enough to call a
wilderness.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Thu 19th Oct 2017, 10:38