Boy Blue and His Friends by Etta Austin Blaisdell and Mary Frances Blaisdell


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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Boy Blue and His Friends
by Etta Austin Blaisdell and Mary Frances Blaisdell

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: Boy Blue and His Friends

Author: Etta Austin Blaisdell and Mary Frances Blaisdell

Illustrator: Maud Touser

Release Date: June 13, 2005 [EBook #16046]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ASCII

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK BOY BLUE AND HIS FRIENDS ***




Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Anuradha Valsa Raj, Leonard
Johnson and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at
http://www.pgdp.net







[Illustration: "Boy Blue and Shep play together in the fields."]


BOY BLUE
AND HIS FRIENDS

BY
ETTA AUSTIN BLAISDELL

AND

MARY FRANCES BLAISDELL

AUTHORS OF "CHILD LIFE," "CHILD LIFE IN TALE AND FABLE,"
"CHILD LIFE IN MANY LANDS," "CHILD LIFE IN LITERATURE," ETC.



COPYRIGHT, 1906,
BY LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY




~PREFACE~


This is a book of short stories for the youngest readers,--stories
about old friends, which they can easily read themselves.

Here they will learn why Mary's Lamb went to school, what the mouse was
looking for when he ran up the clock, why one little pig went to
market, how one little pig got lost, and the answers to a great many
other puzzling questions.

The stories are written around some of the Mother Goose rhymes because
the children love to meet old friends in books just as well as we do.

The vocabulary is limited to words easily recognized by beginners in
reading, and the sentences are made short and direct, so that they will
be understood. The stories progress gradually from very easy to more
difficult matter, keeping pace with the child's increasing knowledge
and ability,--the book being carefully arranged for use as a
supplementary reader, or for home reading for the little ones.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Mon 20th Nov 2017, 9:25