A Loose End and Other Stories by S. Elizabeth Hall


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The Project Gutenberg eBook, A Loose End and Other Stories, by S.
Elizabeth Hall


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: A Loose End and Other Stories
A Loose End; In a Breton Village; Twice a Child; The Road by the Sea; The Halting Step; Tabitha's Aunt


Author: S. Elizabeth Hall

Release Date: May 27, 2005 [eBook #15922]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A LOOSE END AND OTHER STORIES***


E-text prepared by Steven Gibbs, Irma Spehar, and the Project Gutenberg
Online Distributed Proofreading Team



A LOOSE END AND OTHER STORIES

by

S. ELIZABETH HALL

Author of _The Interloper_

London:
Simpkin, Marshall Hamilton, Kent & Co., Ltd.
London: Truslove and Bray, Printers, West Norwood, S.E.







CONTENTS.


A LOOSE END

IN A BRETON VILLAGE

TWICE A CHILD

THE ROAD BY THE SEA

THE HALTING STEP

TABITHA'S AUNT




A LOOSE END.

CHAPTER I.


One September morning, many years ago, when the Channel Islands seemed
further off than they do now, and for some of them communication with
the outer world hardly existed, some two hours after the sun had risen
out of the sea, and while the grass and the low-growing bushes were
still fresh with the morning dew, a young girl tripped lightly along the
ridge of a headland which formed the south side of a cove on the coast
of one of the smaller islands in the group. The ridge ascended gradually
till it reached a point on which stood a ruined building, that was said
to have been once a mill, and from which on the right-hand side the path
began to descend to a narrow landing-place in the cove. The girl stood
still for a moment when she reached the highest point, and shading her
eyes looked out to sea. On the opposite side of the cove a huge rock,
formed into an island by a narrow shaft of water, which in the strife of
ages had cleared its way between it and the rocky coast, frowned dark
and solemn in the shadow, its steep and clear-cut sides giving it a
character of power and imperturbability that crowned it a king among
islands. The sea beyond was glittering in the morning sun, but there was
deep purple shadow in the cove, and under the rocks of the projecting
headlands, which in fantastic succession on either side threw out their
weird arms into the sea; while just around the edge of the shore, where
the water was shallow over rocks and weed, was a girdle of lightest,
loveliest green. Guernsey, idealized in the morning mist, lay like a
dream on the horizon. Here and there a fishing-boat, whose sail flashed
orange when the sun touched it, was tossing on the waves; nearer in a
boat with furled sail was cautiously making for the narrow passage--the
Devil's Drift, as the fishermen called it--between the island and the
mainland, a passage only traversed with oars, the oarsmen facing
forwards; while the two occupants of another were just taking down their
sail preparatory to rowing direct for the landing-place.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Mon 29th May 2017, 11:34