A Apple Pie by Kate Greenaway


Main
- books.jibble.org



My Books
- IRC Hacks

Misc. Articles
- Meaning of Jibble
- M4 Su Doku
- Computer Scrapbooking
- Setting up Java
- Bootable Java
- Cookies in Java
- Dynamic Graphs
- Social Shakespeare

External Links
- Paul Mutton
- Jibble Photo Gallery
- Jibble Forums
- Google Landmarks
- Jibble Shop
- Free Books
- Intershot Ltd

books.jibble.org

Next Page

Page 0

The Project Gutenberg eBook, A Apple Pie, by Kate Greenaway, Illustrated
by Kate Greenaway


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: A Apple Pie


Author: Kate Greenaway

Release Date: May 10, 2005 [eBook #15809]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-646-US (US-ASCII)


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK A APPLE PIE***


E-text prepared by Suzanne Shell, Erika Q. Stokes, and the Project
Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net)



Note: Project Gutenberg also has an HTML version of this
file which includes the original remarkable illustrations.
See 15809-h.htm or 15809-h.zip:
(http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/8/0/15809/15809-h/15809-h.htm)
or
(http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/8/0/15809/15809-h.zip)





A APPLE PIE

by

KATE GREENAWAY

London. Frederick Warne & Co. Ltd. & New York
Printed in Great Britain by W & J Mackay Limited, Chatham from original
woodblock designs engraved in 1886

1886







PUBLISHER'S NOTE

Kate Greenaway used an early version of the rhyme to illustrate
A APPLE PIE which was first published in 1886 and it will be noticed
that there is no rhyme for the letter I.

The rhyme of A APPLE PIE is very ancient and reference is made to it as
early as 1671 in one of the writings of John Eachard. In these early
versions the letters I and J were not differentiated. The letter J as we
know it to-day was the curved initial form of the letter I and was always
used before a vowel.



[Illustration]



Next Page


Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Fri 26th May 2017, 20:56