A Review of Uncle Tom's Cabin by A. Woodward


Main
- books.jibble.org



My Books
- IRC Hacks

Misc. Articles
- Meaning of Jibble
- M4 Su Doku
- Computer Scrapbooking
- Setting up Java
- Bootable Java
- Cookies in Java
- Dynamic Graphs
- Social Shakespeare

External Links
- Paul Mutton
- Jibble Photo Gallery
- Jibble Forums
- Google Landmarks
- Jibble Shop
- Free Books
- Intershot Ltd

books.jibble.org

Previous Page | Next Page

Page 1

None need tell me that there are defects and imperfections in the
work. I am well aware of the fact, but could not remedy them without
re-writing the whole, and that was impracticable under the
circumstances. Critics need not trouble themselves about its defects
as a literary production, as I lay no claim to merit on that ground.
Having been actively engaged in the practice of an arduous and
perplexing profession for the last twenty-five years, I am aware that
my qualifications for authorship must be somewhat defective. I was
moreover forced to write, when my corporeal system was exhausted, and
my mental powers oppressed by a complication of diseases. There are
not many, I conceive, who will find any difficulty in clearly
comprehending the ideas I intended to convey; if so, my object is
accomplished.

The work was written under disadvantageous circumstances; but such as
it is, I cast it out on the great sea of public opinion to abide its
fate. If good is accomplished thereby, I shall rejoice; but if it is
destined to sink into oblivion, I shall console myself with the
reflection that I had no other object in writing, but the correction
of error and the welfare of my fellow creatures. I may err, but I
appeal to "the searcher of all hearts" for the purity of my motives
and intentions. Whatever may be the effects of this work on the public
mind; light and truth were my aim, and the best interests of my fellow
beings, my sole object.

I appear before the public with reluctance, and am exceedingly
mortified that it has fallen to my lot to treat any portion of my
fellow citizens with severity; but I am nevertheless prepared to meet
the sneers and frowns of those implicated. I shall offer no apology
for the harsh language which will be occasionally found in this
volume; as a desperate disease requires an active remedy. If I could,
however, have re-written the work, I would have changed, in some
places, the phraseology. I have brought many and serious charges
against the abolition faction in the United States, but those who are
not guilty of the charges alleged, need not feel aggrieved thereby. My
remarks, for the most part refer to what is called _ultra-abolitionism_.

It is probable that I have occasionally quoted the language of others,
without marking the same as a quotation. If so, it was not
intentional. I could not, in doubtful cases, refer to writers whose
ideas I may have used, on account of ill health. In quoting from the
Bible I relied almost entirely on my own memory; but I presume I am
generally correct.

I have now finished a task--by no means a pleasant one--and I have
done it with a trembling hand, for the subject is a delicate one--a
subject of intense interest, under the existing circumstances, to
every American citizen. To me, the signs of the times appear to be
ominous--to forebode evil! I sometimes fear that our political sun has
passed the zenith--lowering clouds intercept his rays, and at times
obscure his former brightness, majesty and glory. The ship of State is
tossed by furious winds, and threatened by boisterous waves--rocks and
quicksands are on the right and left--an awful wreck awaits her, and
can only be averted by vigilance, prudence, caution and circumspection
on the part of her crew.

GREENCASTLE, IND., May, 1853.




Transcriber's Note: The CONTENTS are printed at the end of this book.




REVIEW OF UNCLE TOM'S CABIN;

OR

AN ESSAY ON SLAVERY.


INTRODUCTION.


SECTION I.

Since the following chapters were prepared for the press, my attention
was directed by a friend, to a letter published in a Northern paper,
which detailed some shocking things, that the writer had seen and
heard in the South; and also some severe strictures on the institution
of domestic slavery in the Southern States, &c.

Previous Page | Next Page


Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Sun 21st Apr 2019, 22:55