The High School Failures by Francis P. Obrien


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Page 2

2. Discontinuance of the Subject or Course, and the
Substitution of Others 68

3. The Employment of School Examinations 69

4. The Service Rendered by the Regents' Examinations in
New York 70

5. Continuation of Subjects Without Repetition or Examination 73

6. Summary of Chapter, and References 74


VI.--DO THE FAILURES REPRESENT A LACK OF CAPABILITY OR OF
FITNESS FOR HIGH SCHOOL WORK ON THE PART OF THOSE PUPILS?

1. Some Are Evidently Misfits 76

2. Most of the Failing Pupils Lack Neither Ability nor
Earnestness 77

3. The School Emphasis and the School Failures Are Both
Culminative in Particular School Subjects 81

4. An Indictment Against the Subject-Matter and the Teaching
Ends as Factors in Producing Failures 83

5. Summary of Chapter, and References 85


VII.--WHAT TREATMENT IS SUGGESTED BY THE DIAGNOSIS OF THE FACTS
OF FAILURE?

1. Organization and Adaptation in Recognition of the
Individual Differences in Abilities and Interests 87

2. Faculty Student Advisers from the Time of Entrance 89

3. Greater Flexibility and Differentiation Required 90

4. Provision for the Direction of the Pupils' Study 92

5. A Greater Recognition and Exposition of the Facts as
Revealed by Accurate and Complete School Records 94

6. Summary of Chapter, and References 96




A STUDY OF THE SCHOOL RECORDS OF THE PUPILS FAILING IN ACADEMIC
OR COMMERCIAL HIGH SCHOOL SUBJECTS




CHAPTER I

GENERAL INTRODUCTION OF THE SUBJECT


1. THE RELEVANCE OF THIS STUDY

As the measuring of the achievements of the public schools has become a
distinctive feature of the more recent activities in the educational
field, the failure in expected accomplishment by the school, and its
proficiency in turning out a negative product, have been forced upon
our attention rather emphatically. The striking growth in the number of
school surveys, measuring scales, questionnaires, and standardized
tests, together with many significant school experiments and
readjustments, bears testimony of our evident demand for a closer
diagnosis of the practices and conditions which are no longer accepted
with complacency.

The American people have expressed their faith in a scheme of universal
democratic education, and have committed themselves to the support of
the free public high school. They have been liberal in their financing
and strong in their faith regarding this enterprise, so typically
American, to a degree that a secondary education may no longer be
regarded as a luxury or a heritage of the rich. No longer may the field
be treated as either optional or exclusive. The statutes of several of
our states now expressly or impliedly extend their compulsory
attendance requirements beyond the elementary years of school. Many,
too, are the lines of more desirable employment for young people which
demand or give preference to graduates of a high school. At the same
time there has been no decline in the importance of high school
graduation for entering the learned or professional pursuits.
Accordingly, it seems highly probable that, with such an extended and
authoritative sphere of influence, a stricter business accounting will
be exacted of the public high school, as the great after-war burdens
make the public less willing to depend on faith in financing so great
an experiment. They will ask, ever more insistently, for facts as to
the expenditures, the finished product, the internal adjustments, and
the waste product of our secondary schools. Such inquiries will indeed
seem justifiable.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Tue 15th Oct 2019, 21:31