The Beacon Second Reader by James H. Fassett


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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Beacon Second Reader, by James H. Fassett

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: The Beacon Second Reader

Author: James H. Fassett

Illustrator: Edna T. Hart

Release Date: April 19, 2005 [EBook #15659]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE BEACON SECOND READER ***




Produced by Mark C. Orton, Melissa Er-Raqabi and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net.






THE
BEACON SECOND READER

BY
JAMES H. FASSETT

GINN AND COMPANY
BOSTON - NEW YORK - CHICAGO - LONDON
ATLANTA - DALLAS - COLUMBUS - SAN FRANCISCO


COPYRIGHT, 1914, BY JAMES H. FASSETT
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
431.1



GINN AND COMPANY - PROPRIETORS -
BOSTON - U.S.A.




PREFACE


In the "Beacon Second Reader" the author has chosen for his stories only
those of recognized literary merit; and while it has been necessary to
rearrange and sometimes rewrite them for the purpose of simplification,
yet he has endeavored to retain the spirit which has served to endear
these ancient tales to the children of all ages. The fairy story appeals
particularly to children who are in the second school year. It has been
proved by our ablest psychologists that at about this period of
development, children are especially susceptible to the stimulus of the
old folklore. They are in fact passing through the stage which
corresponds to the dawn of the human race, when demons, dragons,
fairies, and hobgoblins were as firmly believed in as rivers and
mountains.

As a test of this theory the author asked hundreds of second-grade and
third-grade school children to recall the stories which they had read
during the preceding year, and to express their preferences. The choice
of more than ninety per cent proved to be either folklore stories, pure
and simple, or such tales as contained the folklore element. To be sure,
children like other stories, but they respond at once with sparkling
eyes and animated voices when the fairy tale is suggested. How unwise,
therefore, it is to neglect this powerful stimulus which lies ready at
our hands! Even a pupil who is naturally slow will wade painfully and
laboriously through a fairy story, while he would throw down in disgust
an account of the sprouting of the bean or the mining of coal.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Wed 23rd Aug 2017, 10:05