Recreations in Astronomy by Henry Warren


Main
- books.jibble.org



My Books
- IRC Hacks

Misc. Articles
- Meaning of Jibble
- M4 Su Doku
- Computer Scrapbooking
- Setting up Java
- Bootable Java
- Cookies in Java
- Dynamic Graphs
- Social Shakespeare

External Links
- Paul Mutton
- Jibble Photo Gallery
- Jibble Forums
- Google Landmarks
- Jibble Shop
- Free Books
- Intershot Ltd

books.jibble.org

Previous Page | Next Page

Page 1

Once Astronomy treated mostly of tides, seasons, and telescopic
aspects of the planets; now these are only primary matters. Once
it considered stars as mere fixed points of light; now it studies
them as suns, determines their age, size, color, movements, chemical
constitution, and the revolution of their planets. Once it considered
space as empty; now it knows that every cubic inch of it quivers with
greater intensity of force than that which is visible in Niagara.
Every inch of surface that can be conceived of between suns is more
wave-tossed than the ocean in a storm.

The invention of the telescope constituted one era in Astronomy;
its perfection in our day, another; and the discoveries of the
spectroscope a third--no less important than either of the others.

While nearly all men are prevented from practical experimentation
in these high realms of knowledge, few [Page viii] have so little
leisure as to be debarred from intelligently enjoying the results
of the investigations of others.

This book has been written not only to reveal some of the highest
achievements of the human mind, but also to let the heavens declare
the glory of the Divine Mind. In the author's judgment, there is no
gulf that separates science and religion, nor any conflict where
they stand together. And it is fervently hoped that anyone who
comes to a better knowledge of God's works through reading this
book, may thereby come to a more intimate knowledge of the Worker.

I take great pleasure in acknowledging my indebtedness to J. M.
Van Vleck, LL.D., of the U.S. Nautical Almanac staff, and Professor
of Astronomy at the Wesleyan University, for inspecting some of the
more important chapters; to Dr. S. S. White, of Philadelphia, for
telescopic advantages; to Professor Henry Draper, for furnishing,
in advance of publication, a photograph of the sun's corona in 1878;
and to the excellent work on "Popular Astronomy," by Professor
Simon Newcomb, LL.D., Professor U. S. Naval Observatory, for some
of the most recent information, and for the use of the unequalled
engravings of Jupiter, Saturn, and the great nebula of Orion.




[Page ix]
CONTENTS.

CHAP.
I. CREATIVE PROCESSES
II. CREATIVE PROGRESS
Constitution of Light
Chemistry of Suns revealed by Light
Creative Force of Light
III. ASTRONOMICAL INSTRUMENTS
The Telescope
The Reflecting Telescope
The Spectroscope
IV. CELESTIAL MEASUREMENTS
Celestial Movements
How to Measure
V. THE SUN
What the Sun does for us
VI. THE PLANETS, AS SEEN FROM SPACE
The Outlook from the Earth
VII. SHOOTING-STARS, METEORS, AND COMETS
Aerolites
Comets
Famous Comets
Of what do Comets consist?
Will Comets strike the Earth?
VIII. THE PLANETS AS INDIVIDUALS
Vulcan
Mercury
Venus
The Earth
The Aurora Borealis
[Page x]
The Delicate Balance of Forces
Tides
The Moon
Telescopic Appearance
Eclipses
Mars
Satellites of Mars
Asteroids
Jupiter
Satellites of Jupiter
Saturn
Rings of Saturn
Satellites of Saturn
Uranus
Neptune
IX. THE NEBULAR HYPOTHESIS.
X. THE STELLAR SYSTEM
The Open Page of the Heavens
Equatorial Constellations
Characteristics of the Stars
Number
Double and Multiple Stars
Colored Stars
Clusters of Stars

Variable Stars
Temporary, New, and Lost Stars
Movements of Stars
XI. THE WORLDS AND THE WORD
XII. THE ULTIMATE FORCE
SUMMARY OF LATEST DISCOVERIES AND CONCLUSIONS
SOME ELEMENTS OF THE SOLAR SYSTEM
EXPLANATION OF ASTRONOMICAL SYMBOLS
Signs of the Zodiac
Other Abbreviations Used in the Almanac
Greek Alphabet Used Indicating the Stars
CHAUTAUQUA OUTLINE FOR STUDENTS
GLOSSARY OF ASTRONOMICAL TERMS AND INDEX

Previous Page | Next Page


Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Fri 10th Jul 2020, 11:48