The Loving Ballad of Lord Bateman by Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray


Main
- books.jibble.org



My Books
- IRC Hacks

Misc. Articles
- Meaning of Jibble
- M4 Su Doku
- Computer Scrapbooking
- Setting up Java
- Bootable Java
- Cookies in Java
- Dynamic Graphs
- Social Shakespeare

External Links
- Paul Mutton
- Jibble Photo Gallery
- Jibble Forums
- Google Landmarks
- Jibble Shop
- Free Books
- Intershot Ltd

books.jibble.org

Next Page

Page 0

The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Loving Ballad of Lord Bateman, by Charles
Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray, Illustrated by George Cruikshank


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: The Loving Ballad of Lord Bateman


Author: Charles Dickens and William Makepeace Thackeray

Release Date: April 14, 2005 [eBook #15618]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-646-US (US-ASCII)


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE LOVING BALLAD OF LORD
BATEMAN***


E-text prepared by Jason Isbell, Ben Beasley, and the Project Gutenberg
Online Distributed Proofreading Team



Note: Project Gutenberg also has an HTML version of this file which
includes the original illustrations and sound files of the music.
See 15618-h.htm or 15618-h.zip:
(http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/6/1/15618/15618-h/15618-h.htm)
or
(http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/6/1/15618/15618-h.zip)





THE LOVING BALLAD OF LORD BATEMAN.

ILLUSTRATED BY GEORGE CRUIKSHANK.

London
Charles Tilt, Fleet Street
and Mustapha Syried, Constantinople

MDCCCXXXIX







Warning to the Public

CONCERNING

THE LOVING BALLAD OF LORD BATEMAN.


In some collection of old English Ballads there is an ancient ditty which
I am told bears some remote and distant resemblance to the following Epic
Poem. I beg to quote the emphatic language of my estimable friend (if he
will allow me to call him so), the Black Bear in Piccadilly, and to assure
all to whom these presents may come, that "_I_ am the original." This
affecting legend is given in the following pages precisely as I have
frequently heard it sung on Saturday nights, outside a house of general
refreshment (familiarly termed a wine vaults) at Battle-bridge. The singer
is a young gentleman who can scarcely have numbered nineteen summers,
and who before his last visit to the treadmill, where he was erroneously
incarcerated for six months as a vagrant (being unfortunately mistaken
for another gentleman), had a very melodious and plaintive tone of voice,
which, though it is now somewhat impaired by gruel and such a getting up
stairs for so long a period, I hope shortly to find restored. I have taken
down the words from his own mouth at different periods, and have been
careful to preserve his pronunciation, together with the air to which he
does so much justice. Of his execution of it, however, and the intense
melancholy which he communicates to such passages of the song as are most
susceptible of such an expression, I am unfortunately unable to convey to
the reader an adequate idea, though I may hint that the effect seems to me
to be in part produced by the long and mournful drawl on the last two or
three words of each verse.

Next Page


Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Sat 27th May 2017, 9:54