Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, October 29, 1892 by Various


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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103,
October 29, 1892, by Various, Edited by F. C. Burnand


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, October 29, 1892


Author: Various

Release Date: April 12, 2005 [eBook #15605]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI,
VOL. 103, OCTOBER 29, 1892***


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PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI

VOL. 103

OCTOBER 29, 1892







IMPRESSIONS OF "IL TROVATORE."

(_BY A MATTER-OF-FACT PHILISTINE AT COVENT GARDEN._)

ACT I. SCENE 2.--_Leonora's_ confidant evidently alive to the
responsibilities of her position. Watch her, for example, when her
Mistress is about to confide to her ear the dawn of her passion for
_Manrico_. She walks _Leonora_ gently down to the footlights, launches
her into her solo, like a boat, and stands aside on the left, a
little behind, with an air of apprehension, lest she should come to
grief over the next high note, and a hand in readiness to support her
elbow in case she should suddenly collapse. Then, feeling partially
reassured, she goes round to inspect her from the right, where she
remains until her superior has completed her confidences, and it is
time to lead her away. Operatic confidant sympathetic--but a more
modern heroine might find one "get on her nerves," perhaps. _Manrico_
a very robust type of Troubadour--but oughtn't a Troubadour to carry
about a guitar, or a lute, or something? If _Manrico_ has one, he
invariably leaves it outside. Probably doesn't see why, with so many
competent musicians in the orchestra, he should take the trouble of
playing his own accompaniments. And why does the Curtain invariably
come down as soon as swords are drawn? Tantalising to have all the
duels and fighting done during the _entr'actes._

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