Rough Stone Monuments and Their Builders by T. Eric Peet


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Project Gutenberg's Rough Stone Monuments and Their Builders, by T. Eric Peet

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
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with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: Rough Stone Monuments and Their Builders

Author: T. Eric Peet

Release Date: April 8, 2005 [EBook #15590]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ROUGH STONE MONUMENTS AND ***




Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Peter Barozzi and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team.





[Illustration: STONEHENGE FROM THE SOUTH-EAST]




ROUGH STONE
MONUMENTS
AND THEIR
BUILDERS


BY

T. ERIC PEET

FORMERLY SCHOLAR OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE, OXFORD;
LATELY CRAVEN FELLOW IN THE UNIVERSITY
OF OXFORD AND PELHAM STUDENT AT
THE BRITISH SCHOOL OF ROME




HARPER & BROTHERS
LONDON AND NEW YORK
45 ALBEMARLE STREET, W.
1912



_Published October, 1912_.




PREFACE

The aim of this volume is to enable those who are interested in
Stonehenge and other great stone monuments of England to learn something
of the similar buildings which exist in different parts of the world, of


useful as a complete though brief sketch of our present knowledge of the
megalithic monuments, and as a short treatment of the problems which
arise in connection with them.

To British readers it is unnecessary to give any justification for the
comparatively full treatment accorded to the monuments of Great Britain
and Ireland. Malta and Sardinia may perhaps seem to occupy more than
their due share of space, but the usurpation is justified by the
magnificence and the intrinsic interest of their megalithic buildings.
Being of singularly complicated types and remarkably well preserved they
naturally tell us much more of their builders than do the simpler
monuments of other larger and now more important countries. In these two
islands, moreover, research has in the last few years been extremely
active, and it is felt that the accounts here given of them will contain


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