The Law and the Word by Thomas Troward


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Page 1

III MAN'S PLACE IN THE CREATIVE ORDER 44

IV THE LAW OF WHOLENESS 75

V THE SOUL OF THE SUBJECT 85

VI THE PROMISES 103

VII DEATH AND IMMORTALITY 132

VIII TRANSFERRING THE BURDEN 168




FOREWORD

THOMAS TROWARD

AN APPRECIATION


How is one to know a friend? Certainly not by the duration of
acquaintance. Neither can friendship be bought or sold by service
rendered. Nor can it be coined into acts of gallantry or phrases of
flattery. It has no part in the small change of courtesy. It is outside
all these, containing them all and superior to them all.

To some is given the great privilege of a day set apart to mark the
arrival of a total stranger panoplied with all the insignia of
friendship. He comes unannounced. He bears no letter of introduction. No
mutual friend can vouch for him. Suddenly and silently he steps
unexpectedly out of the shadow of material concern and spiritual
obscurity, into the radiance of intimate friendship, as a picture is
projected upon a lighted screen. But unlike the phantom picture he is an
instant reality that one's whole being immediately recognizes, and the
radiance of fellowship that pervades his word, thought and action holds
all the essence of long companionship.

Unfortunately there are too few of these bright messengers of God to be
met with in life's pilgrimage, but that Judge Troward was one of them
will never be doubted by the thousands who are now mourning his
departure from among us. Those whose closest touch with him has been the
reading of his books will mourn him as a friend only less than those who
listened to him on the platform. For no books ever written more clearly
expressed the author. The same simple lucidity and gentle humanity, the
same effort to discard complicated non-essentials, mark both the man and
his books.

Although the spirit of benign friendliness pervades his writings and
illuminated his public life, yet much of his capacity for friendship was
denied those who were not privileged to clasp hands with him and to sit
beside him in familiar confidence. Only in the intimacy of the fireside
did he wholly reveal his innate modesty and simplicity of character.
Here alone, glamoured with his radiating friendship, was shown the
wealth of his richly-stored mind equipped by nature and long training to
deal logically with the most profound and abstruse questions of life.
Here indeed was proof of his greatness, his unassuming superiority, his
humanity, his keen sense of honour, his wit and humour, his generosity
and all the characteristics of a rare gentleman, a kindly philosopher
and a true friend.

To Judge Troward was given the logician's power to strip a subject bare
of all superfluous and concealing verbiage, and to exhibit the gleaming
jewels of truth and reality in splendid simplicity. This supreme
quality, this ability to make the complex simple, the power to
subordinate the non-essential, gave to his conversation, to his
lectures, to his writings, and in no less degree to his personality, a

compelled confidence and affection.

His sincerity was beyond question. However much one might differ from
him in opinion, at least one never doubted his profound faith and
complete devotion to truth. His guileless nature was beyond ungenerous
suspicions and selfish ambitions. He walked calmly upon his way wrapped
in the majesty of his great thoughts, oblivious to the vexations of the
world's cynicism. Charity and reverence for the indwelling spirit marked
all his human relations. Tolerance of the opinions of others,
benevolence and tenderness dwelt in his every word and act. Yet his
careful consideration of others did not paralyze the strength of his
firm will or his power to strike hard blows at wrong and error. The
search for truth, to which his life was devoted, was to him a holy
quest. That he could and would lay a lance in defence of his opinions is
evidenced in his writings, and has many times been demonstrated to the
discomfiture of assailing critics. But his urbanity was a part of
himself and never departed from him.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Mon 16th Dec 2019, 10:23