The War Chief of the Ottawas by Thomas Guthrie Marquis


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Project Gutenberg's The War Chief of the Ottawas, by Thomas Guthrie Marquis

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
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with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: The War Chief of the Ottawas
A Chronicle of the Pontiac War: Volume 15 (of 32) in the
series Chronicles of Canada

Author: Thomas Guthrie Marquis

Release Date: April 2, 2005 [EBook #15522]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ASCII

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE WAR CHIEF OF THE OTTAWAS ***




This etext was produced by Gardner Buchanan.





CHRONICLES OF CANADA
Edited by George M. Wrong and H. H. Langton
In thirty-two volumes

Volume 15


THE WAR CHIEF OF THE OTTAWAS
A Chronicle of the Pontiac War

By THOMAS GUTHRIE MARQUIS
TORONTO, 1915


CONTENTS

I. THE TIMES AND THE MEN
II. PONTIAC AND THE TRIBES OF THE HINTERLAND
III. THE GATHERING STORM
IV. THE SIEGE OF DETROIT
V. THE FALL OF THE LESSER FORTS
VI. THE RELIEF OF FORT PITT
VII. DETROIT ONCE MORE
VIII. WINDING UP THE INDIAN WAR
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE




CHAPTER I

THE TIMES AND THE MEN

There was rejoicing throughout the Thirteen Colonies, in
the month of September 1760, when news arrived of the
capitulation of Montreal. Bonfires flamed forth and
prayers were offered up in the churches and meeting-houses
in gratitude for deliverance from a foe that for over a
hundred years had harried and had caused the Indians to
harry the frontier settlements. The French armies were
defeated by land; the French fleets were beaten at sea.
The troops of the enemy had been removed from North
America, and so powerless was France on the ocean that,
even if success should crown her arms on the European
continent, where the Seven Years' War was still raging,
it would be impossible for her to transport a new force
to America. The principal French forts in America were
occupied by British troops. Louisbourg had been razed to
the ground; the British flag waved over Quebec, Montreal,
and Niagara, and was soon to be raised on all the lesser
forts in the territory known as Canada. The Mississippi
valley from the Illinois river southward alone remained
to France. Vincennes on the Wabash and Fort Chartres on
the Mississippi were the only posts in the hinterland
occupied by French troops. These posts were under the
government of Louisiana; but even these the American
colonies were prepared to claim, basing the right on
their 'sea to sea' charters.

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