Charles Duran by The Author of The Waldos


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Page 1

CHAPTER IV.

CHARLES DURAN AT SCHOOL.

Good children at home are good in school--Conduct--Inattention to
studies--Unkind to his school-mates--Samuel Howard--Helen Fay--John and
Louisa--Severe whipping--Mr. Spicer--Charles expelled from school


CHAPTER V.

CHARLES'S HABITS.

Good habits--Proverbs of the Rabbins--Charles not
improved--Idleness--Fishing and hunting--No idle boy can be
good--Shooting--Roughness of manners--One vice is followed by
another--Lying--Sabbath-breaking--Intemperance--A standard of wickedness


CHAPTER VI.

THE FATAL NIGHT.

Village balls--Description--Culpability of parents--Demand for
money--Fit--House stoned--Windows broken in--Mr. Duran with the
bag--Charles's wrath appeased--The ball--Charles intoxicated--Falls to
the floor--Brought home speechless--Laid upon his death-bed



CHAPTER VII

SICKNESS AND DEATH.

Sufferings from the debauch--Crisis--Favorable change--Hopes of recovery
cut off--Consumption--Contrivance to change his position--State of
mind--The minister visits him--No evidence of penitence--The dying scene


CHAPTER VIII.

THE CONCLUSION.

The way of transgressors hard--Disobedience to parents a fearful
sin--Parental restraint--Pleasures of parental approbation--Disobedience
in scholars--Reflections--Sporting habits in children not to be
encouraged--Importance of early religious training--History of young
Duran a warning to Sabbath-breakers, &c.--Beware of the first sin--The
End




CHARLES DURAN.




CHAPTER I.

THE DURAN HOMESTEAD.


Before giving the history of Charles Duran's birth, life, and early
death, I will partially describe his father's residence. It was situated
in the town of ----, in the State of Connecticut, and about six miles
from the west bank of the beautiful Connecticut river. The house stood
on a level road, running north and south, and was about one mile from
the centre of the town.

Mr. Duran's house was large and commodious. It was built of wood, two
stories high, and painted a deep yellow. In the front was a fine
court-yard. In this yard were lilacs of a large growth, roses of various
kinds, and flowering almonds. These shrubs blossomed early in the
spring, and sent forth their fragrance to perfume the air.

On the south was a rich and well-cultivated garden, producing an
abundance of vegetables, gooseberries, currants, and raspberries. The
borders of the main alley were decked with pionies, pinks, and
sweet-williams.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Fri 22nd Mar 2019, 10:32