Heiress of Haddon by William E. Doubleday


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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Heiress of Haddon, by William E. Doubleday

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: Heiress of Haddon

Author: William E. Doubleday

Release Date: March 23, 2005 [EBook #15443]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HEIRESS OF HADDON ***




Produced by S.R.Ellison,Julie Barkley, and the PG Online
Distributed Proofreading Team.






[EIGHTH EDITION.]

THE

HEIRESS OF HADDON.

BY

WM. E. DOUBLEDAY.


LONDON:

SIMPKIN, MARSHALL, HAMILTON, KENT AND CO., LIMITED.


BUXTON AND BAKEWELL:

U.F. WARDLEY, "HIGH PEAK NEWS" OFFICES.




PREFACE


The real romance of Haddon Hall is a sweet, old-world idyll of
singular attractiveness and interest. The gems of the story have been
reset by dramatists in different surroundings; but while, as in the
Sullivan-Grundy opera, many of its chief incidents have been retained,
many have been omitted.

In the old story there are no Puritans, and not one solitary Scotchman
appears upon the scene. The original drama was enacted in the pastoral
days of "Good Queen Bess," when the Tudor Queen was still young and
beautiful, and

"When all the world was young, lad,
And all the trees were green;
And every goose a swan, lad,
And every lass a queen."

Haddon Hall, the scene of the story, is situated at the foot of the
Peak, between Bakewell and Chatsworth, close to Matlock, and not far
from Buxton. Far from the madding crowd the hoary old edifice stands,
carefully preserved, and generously thrown open to public view by its
princely owners, the Dukes of Rutland, who, though for more than a
century back they have ceased to inhabit it, have yet most carefully
protected the building from falling into the slightest disrepair.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Mon 29th May 2017, 7:43