St. Nicholas, Vol. 5, No. 5, March, 1878 by Various


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Project Gutenberg's St. Nicholas, Vol. 5, No. 5, March, 1878, by Various

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: St. Nicholas, Vol. 5, No. 5, March, 1878

Author: Various

Release Date: March 15, 2005 [EBook #15374]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK ST. NICHOLAS, VOL. 5, NO. 5, ***




Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Lynn Bornath and the Online Distributed
Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net.






[Illustration: A HORSE AT SEA. [See page 367.]]




ST. NICHOLAS.

VOL. V.
MARCH, 1878.
No. 5.


[Copyright, 1878, by Scribner & Co.]




HANSA, THE LITTLE LAPP MAIDEN.

BY KATHARINE LEE.


Once upon a time, in a very small village on the borders of one of the
great pine forests of Norway, there lived a wood-cutter, named Peder
Olsen. He had built himself a little log-house, in which he dwelt with
his twin boys, Olaf and Erik, and their little sister Olga.

Merry, happy children were these three, full of life and health, and
always ready for a frolic. Even during the long, cold, dark winter
months, they were joyous and contented. It was never too cold for these
hardy little Norse folk, and the ice and snow which for so many months
covered the land, they looked on as sent for their especial enjoyment.

The wood-cutter had made a sledge for the boys, just a rough box on
broad, wooden runners, to be sure, but it glided lightly and swiftly
over the hard, frozen surface of snow, and the daintiest silver-tipped
sledge could not have given them more pleasure.

They shared it, generously, with each other, as brothers should, and
gave Olga many a good swift ride; but it was cold work for the little
maid, sitting still, and, after a while, she chose rather to watch the
boys from the little window, as they took turns in playing "reindeer."

One day they both wanted to be "reindeer" at once, and begged Olga to
come and drive, but the chimney corner was bright and warm, and she
would not go.

"Of course," said Olaf; "what else could one expect? She is only a
girl! I would far rather take Krikel; he is always ready. Hi! Krikel!
come take a ride!" and he whistled to the clever little black Spitz dog


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