Society for Pure English Tract 4 by John Sargeaunt


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Project Gutenberg's Society for Pure English Tract 4, by John Sargeaunt

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: Society for Pure English Tract 4
The Pronunciation of English Words Derived from the Latin

Author: John Sargeaunt

Annotator: H. Bradley


Release Date: March 15, 2005 [EBook #15364]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SOCIETY FOR PURE ENGLISH TRACT 4 ***




Produced by David Starner, William Flis, and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team.





Transcriber's Note: Phonetic characters are represented by the
following symbols:
[^1] = raised "1", etc.
[e] = inverted "e" or schwa
[oe] = oe ligature character
['x] = any letter "x" with acute accent
[=x] = any letter "x" with macron
[)x] = any letter "x" with breve
[=xy] = any pair of letters "xy" with joining macron, except
[=OE], [=ae] = OE, ae ligature characters with macron
['oe], ['ae] = oe, ae ligature characters with acute accent and
[)xy] = any pair of letters "xy" with joining breve, except
[)AE], [)ae], [)OE], [)oe] = AE, ae, OE, oe ligature characters
with breve



_S.P.E. TRACT NO. IV_

THE PRONUNCIATION OF ENGLISH WORDS DERIVED FROM THE LATIN

BY JOHN SARGEAUNT

WITH PREFACE AND NOTES BY H. BRADLEY

CORRESPONDENCE & MISCELLANEOUS NOTES BY H.B., R.B., W.H.F., AND
EDITORIAL


_AT THE CLARENDON PRESS_ MDCCCCXX




ON THE PRONUNCIATION OF ENGLISH WORDS DERIVED FROM LATIN


[This paper may perhaps need a few words of introduction concerning
the history of the pronunciation of Latin in England.

The Latin taught by Pope Gregory's missionaries to their English
converts at the beginning of the seventh century was a living
language. Its pronunciation, in the mouths of educated people when
they spoke carefully, was still practically what it had been in
the first century, with the following important exceptions. 1. The
consonantal _u_ was sounded like the _v_ of modern English, 2. The _c_

_t[)i]_, _c[)i]_ before vowels, were pronounced _ts_. 3. The _g_
before front vowels had a sound closely resembling that of the Latin
consonantal _i_. 4. The _s_ between vowels was pronounced like our

diphthongs, but like the simple _e_. 6. The ancient vowel-quantities
were preserved only in the penultima of polysyllables (where they
determined the stress); in all other positions the original system of
quantities had given place to a new system based mainly on rhythm. Of
this system in detail we have little certain knowledge; but one of
its features was that the vowel which ended the first syllable of
a disyllabic was always long: _p[=a]ter_, _p[=a]trem_, _D[=e]us_,
_p[=i]us_, _[=i]ter_, _[=o]vis_, _h[=u]mus_.

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