Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, September 17, 1892 by Various


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The Project Gutenberg eBook, Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103,
September 17, 1892, by Various, Edited by F. C. Burnand


This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net





Title: Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, September 17, 1892

Author: Various

Release Date: March 12, 2005 [eBook #15332]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1


***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI,
VOL. 103, SEPTEMBER 17, 1892***


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PUNCH, OR THE LONDON CHARIVARI

VOL. 103

SEPTEMBER 17, 1892







HEARING HIMSELF.

(_MYSTERIOUS MEM. FROM A HAWARDEN NOTE-BOOK._)


few here present who have never enjoyed the privilege of listening to
Mr. GLADSTONE." Ha! ha! He little thought there was _one_ there who
had _not_ "enjoyed that privilege." Have enjoyed most privileges in
my time, but never that of "hearing myself as others hear me"--more or
less. "Unavoidable absence of Mr. GLADSTONE!" Ho! ho! Then my disguise
_was_ perfect. Get myself up as a Liberal Unionist, with wig and
eye-glass. Not likely anybody would recognise me in _that_ rig.

Rather enjoyed myself--and my paper, "Phoenician Elements in the
Homeric Poems." Most seductive title! Such a _popular_ touch about it!
Think I shall have it printed as a "leaflet" for distribution among
Workmen's Clubs and Radical Associations. Might conciliate those
well-meaning but illogical Eight-Hour Men. Wonder if KEIRHARDIE would
like a copy. What more nicely calculated to cheer the scant leisure of
Labour?

Funny to hear my own sinuous sentences coming back to me from mouth
of another. Not quite sure MAX is so "fascinating in his voice, and
so persuasive in his delivery" as--but no matter. Can't say--as MAX
did--"I felt myself carried away, and convinced almost against my
will." Not at all! Wonder what he meant by that? Why "against his
will"? That's what Liberal Unionists, and other preposterous and
illogical opponents of mine say in House, when they compliment me on
my "eloquence," _and then vote against me!_ Absurd! Wish they'd drop
their compliments and vote straight.

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Books | Photos | Paul Mutton | Tue 27th Jun 2017, 7:15