The Mirrors of Downing Street by Harold Begbie


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Project Gutenberg's The Mirrors of Downing Street, by Harold Begbie

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


Title: The Mirrors of Downing Street
Some Political Reflections by a Gentleman with a Duster

Author: Harold Begbie

Release Date: March 9, 2005 [EBook #15306]

Language: English

Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1

*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE MIRRORS OF DOWNING STREET ***




Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Martin Pettit and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team.






[Illustration: RT. HON. DAVID LLOYD GEORGE]



THE MIRRORS OF
DOWNING STREET

SOME POLITICAL REFLECTIONS

BY
A GENTLEMAN WITH A DUSTER (Harold Begbie)


"_Right and wrong are in the nature of things. They are not words and
phrases. They are in the nature of things, and if you transgress the
laws laid down, imposed by the nature of things, depend upon it you will
pay the penalty_."

JOHN MORLEY.

_ILLUSTRATED_

G. P. PUTNAM'S SONS
NEW YORK AND LONDON
The Knickerbocker Press
1921




COPYRIGHT, 1921

BY

G.P. PUTNAM'S SONS


_Printed in the United States of America_



PUBLISHERS' NOTE

America and England have worked and fought together and have brought to
a successful conclusion the great war in defence of civilization against
a military imperialism which was threatening to dominate the world. They
have now responsibilities together in connection with the measures
needed to assure the continued peace of the world and to secure,
particularly for the smaller states and for communities not in a
position to become independent nations, the protection of their
liberties, to which they have as assured a right as that asserted by a
state of first importance which can support its claims with great
armies.

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